Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Fields of Grace’

What’s In A Name?

Fields of Grace. That’s the name we gave our ministry three years ago. What does it have to do with adoption and orphan care, really? Sometimes I wonder if people even know the significance of the name.

wheat_harvest_grain_465717_o

As you read the Bible, you can’t help but notice three groups of people that come up again and again. God continually draws our attention to the orphans, the widows, and aliens (strangers). “What these people have in common is their desperate need of provision and protection. They are the weak, the under-privileged, and the needy among us.”  (Fields of  the Fatherless, C. Thomas Moore)  More than 60 times, scripture draws our attention to the need for caring for these individuals and include His promises to them–a father to the fatherless, their defender, promise to ensure justice, to bless them. Many passages in both the Old and New Testaments confirm God’s commitment to these special groups.

I don’t know about you, but this makes me stop and wonder.  What am I doing for any or all of these, the least of these?

“The Bible reveals that God commanded His people, the church, to set aside a portion of their fields, their provisions, for the sole purpose of providing for these groups. The line that designated this special area was called the ‘ancient boundary.’ It created a field, figuratively and literally, in which the fatherless, orphan, or widow could find the provision necessary to survive.”  (Fields of the Fatherless. C. Thomas Davis)  There was nothing they had to do to earn this provision, hence, the Fields of Grace.

Deuteronomy 24:19-21 records God’s directives:
When you reap your harvest in your field, and forget a sheaf in the field, you shall not go back to get it; it shall be for the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow, that the LORD your God may bless you in all the work of your hands. When you beat your olive trees, you shall not go over the boughs again; it shall be for the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow. When you gather the grapes of your vineyard, you shall not glean it afterward; it shall be for the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow.

Grape-Vine

And so I wonder, what am I doing for “the least of these?” What are you doing for “the least of these?” What is our church doing for “the least of these?”

What is your field of grace? Do you have enough margin in your life or your budget that you can “let it lie”, you don’t have to go back and glean it afterward and pick up every last bit for yourself?

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this, if you’ve had moments alone with God where He has revealed things to you about His call to care for “the least of these,” — the orphan, the widows, the aliens.” It doesn’t mean every one of us has to adopt children into our homes or become licensed foster families. While it does mean that for some, or others it calls us to enable those who are called to do those things to support them, financially, with meals, with respite.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

At the end of our work day on Friday, a large group of the children gathered together to sing us several songs. It had been a very physical day of digging and cleaning but ended with this and a couple of hours playing with the kids.

Read Full Post »